Join our Mailing List

"For a happier, more stable and civilized future, each of us must develop a sincere, warm-hearted feeling of brotherhood and sisterhood."

Letter from international organizations to Honduran Judiciary and U.S./Canadian Diplomats

July 20, 2011

The CTC signed this letter because we believe that the rights we are working to attain for the Tibetan people in regards to their free, prior and informed consent on mining projects are universal rights and we're proud to stand with our international colleagues in the face of such injustices.

http://www.quotha.net/node/1885

Dear Representatives of the Honduran Justice System and the Canadian and US Diplomatic Corps in Honduras,

The below-signed international civil society organizations write to express our deep concern about the criminalization of environmental defenders in the case of eighteen members of the Siria Valley Environmental Committee of Honduras.

On July 5th 2011, we learned that three members of this committee, including Carlos Danilo Amador, Marlon Hernández and Juan Ángel Reconca, were temporarily detained and that warrants were out for the arrest of fifteen others. All face serious charges for allegedly having obstructed a forestry management plan, which could lead to possible jail sentences of four to six years. On July 5th and July 8th, the other fifteen members of the committee with warrants out for their arrest voluntarily presented themselves to the judge in Talanga, with legal support from the Committee of Family Members of the Detained and Disappeared of Honduras (COFADEH). They were released with precautionary measures until their preliminary hearing on August 2nd.

The Siria Valley Environmental Committee is internationally recognized for its role in the defense of the right to a healthy environment for local communities. They actively oppose the expansion of Goldcorp's San Martín mine (operated by Goldcorp’s subsidiary Entre Mares Honduras), which after only nine years in operation, and now in the process of closure, has left a legacy of acid mine drainage as confirmed by highly regarded researchers from Newcastle University. [1] Following a visit near the site in 2008, Professor Paul Younger found indications “that the mining operation has unfortunately created uncontrolled legacies which have the potential to continue damaging the environment – and thus agricultural production and people's health – for centuries to come, unless the closure plan is amended to ensure the company install treatment measures with sufficient bond funding to ensure they can be maintained in perpetuity.” Since the mine went into operation, local community members have reported dead cattle, dried up rivers, miscarriages, as well as respiratory, skin and gastro-intestinal diseases. [2]

According to the Committee of Family Members of the Detained and Disappeared of Honduras (COFADEH), current criminal charges against committee members are related to their efforts to protect a mini-watershed in the Municipality of El Porvenir from logging as part of a forestry management plan that the Honduran State granted to Hayde Urrutia Mejía. COFADEH indicates that this watershed supplies water for human consumption to six communities in the municipality, directly affecting 10,000 residents who have been protecting this forest for years. They also state that local residents achieved formal protection of this area in 2007 through an agreement with the State Forestry Administration of Honduras. The Siria Valley Environmental Committee consider that Urrutia Mejía’s forestry management plan is illegal due to irregularities in land holdings and for allegedly failing to carry out an appropriate Environmental Impact Assessment with adequate local participation.

Rights Action reports that the Committee is further concerned that this area falls within mining concessions previously granted to Goldcorp, such that degradation of the area through logging could make it easier for the land to be sold to the company and licenses obtained to facilitate mining in the future. A member of the Honduran Centre for the Promotion of Community Development (CEHPRODEC) has echoed this same concern, saying the case represents a “new strategic alliance between mining and logging interests.”

The conflict came to a head on April 7, 2010 when around 600 community members opposed efforts to advance logging on this property. This latter event is believed to have led to the charges that Committee members now face.

Honduran organizations involved express concern that the justice system is continuing to lend itself to the criminalization of human rights defenders, as well as the interests of national and foreign capital.

As international civil society organizations, we are concerned about the criminalization of these environmental defenders. The charges against the members of the committee are further exacerbated by tough conditions placed on them as part of their provisional release from detention, which impede them from carrying out monitoring and defense of the watershed. As a result, we ask that:

  1. The Honduran State take all necessary measures to guarantee the personal freedom, due process, and the right to defend human rights of Carlos Danilo Amador, Marlon Hernández, Juan Ángel Reconco and all other members of the Siria Valley Environmental Committee;
  2. Acts of retaliation against them cease; and
  3. Their right to defend universally recognized human rights as established in the United Nations Universal Declaration on Human Rights Defenders, approved in 1998, and similar OAS Resolutions emitted in 1999 and 2000, be protected.

Several international organizations will continue to observe this case closely, with concern that due process be adhered to and the law applied effectively, while ensuring protection for human rights defenders and their right to defend human rights.

Sincerely,

Alliance for Global Justice (USA)
Atlantic Regional Solidarity Network (Canada)
BC CASA/Café Justicia (Canada)
Cambridge - El Salvador Sister City Project (MA, USA)
Campaign for Labor Rights (USA)
Canadians against Mining in El Salvador (CAMES)
Canada Philippines Solidarity for Human Rights
Canada Tibet Committee (CTC)
CEIBA (Guatemala)
Center for Alternative Mining Development Policy (Wisconsin, USA)
Center for International Environmental Law (Washington D.C., USA)
Chicago-Cinquera Sister Cities of Chicago (USA)
Chicago Religious Leadership Network on Latin America (CRLN) (Chicago, IL, USA)
CoDevelopment Canada
Comite de Apoyo para el Desarrollo Social en El Salvador (CODESES) (BC, Canada)
Colectivo Voces Ecológicas COVEC (Panamá)
Comité pour les droits humains en Amérique latine (CDHAL) (QC, Canada)
Comite Solidario Graciela Garcia (Los Angeles, CA, USA)
Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvador (CISPES) (USA)
Consejo Indigena MONEXICO (Nicaragua)
Council of Canadians
The Democracy Center (Bolivia and USA)
FNRP Collective – Vancouver (BC, Canada)
Friends of Chilama of Crystal Lake (IL, USA)
Hondurans for Democracy
Jamie Moffett Media Design & Production, Staff (USA)
Just Foreign Policy (USA)
Latin America Solidarity Committee - Milwaukee (USA)
La Voz de los de Abajo, Chicago (USA)
Lawrence-El Papaturro Friendship Committee of Lawrence, Kansas (USA)
Madison Arcatao Sister City Project (MASCP) (USA)
Maquila Solidarity Network (Canada)
Marin Interfaith Task Force on the Americas (CA, USA)
Maritimes-Guatemala Breaking the Silence Solidarity Network (Canada)
Maryknoll Office for Global Concerns (USA)
Midwest Coalition Against Lethal Mining (MCALM) (USA)
Mining Justice Alliance – Vancouver (BC, Canada)
Mining Justice – Ottawa (ON, Canada)
MiningWatch Canada
Nicaragua Network (USA)
Oberlin in Solidarity with El Salvador (OSES) (OH, USA)
The Polaris Institute (Canada)
Portland Central America Solidarity Committee (PCASC) (USA)
Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC)
Red Mexicana de Afectados por la Minería (REMA) (México)
Rights Action (USA & Canada)
The Social Justice Committee of Montreal (Canada)
UNBC Guatemala Research Group (Canada)
U.S.-El Salvador Sister Cities

[1] Younger, Paul, “Report on a visit to San Martín mine of Minerales Entremares S.A., Hondures on Sunday 16th November 2008,” December 16, 2008; and Dr. Jarvis, Adam and Dr. Jaime Amezaga, “Technical review of mine closure plan and mine closure implementation at Minerales Entre Mares San Martin mine, Honduras,” June 2009.

[2] The Guardian, “Gold giant faces Honduras inquiry into alleged heavy metal pollution,” December 31st 2009, http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2009/dec/31/goldcorp-honduras-poll... and Latin American Water Tribunal, Public Hearing in Guadalajara, Mexico, October 11 2007, http://www.rightsaction.org/Alerts/Goldcorp_LAWater_092307.html


 

Estimadas autoridades del sistema judicial hondureño y del cuerpo diplomático norteamericano en Honduras,

Las organizaciones internacionales de la sociedad civil que firman esta carta, nos dirigimos a ustedes para expresar nuestra profunda preocupación por la criminalización de los defensores y las defensoras del medioambiente en el caso de 18 miembros del Comité Ambiental del Valle de Siria de Honduras.

El 5 de julio de 2011, recibimos noticias que tres miembros de este comité, Carlos Danilo Amador, Marlon Hernández, y Juan Ángel Reconca, estuvieron detenidos temporalmente y que habían ordenes por la captura de quince miembros más del comité. Todos enfrentan procesos legales graves por haber obstaculizado un plan de manejo forestal, lo cual podría resultar en sentencias de cuatro a seis años en la carcel. El 5 y el 8 de julio de 2011, los demás miembros del comité con ordenes por su captura se presentaron voluntariamente ante el juzgado de Talanga, con asesoría legal del Comité de Familiares de Detenidos y Desaparecidos en Honduras (COFADEH). El juzgado les dejaron libres con medidas sustitutivas a la prisión hasta su audiencia preliminar el 2 de agosto de 2011.

El Comité Ambiental del Valle de Siria está reconocido a nivel internacional por su rol en la defensa al derecho colectivo a vivir en un ambiente sano. El comité se opone activamente a la expansión de la mina San Martín que pertenece a la empresa minera Goldcorp (operada por su subsidiario Entre Mares Honduras), que después de nueve años en operación, y ahora en el proceso de cierre, ha dejado un legado de drenaje ácido minero como fue confirmado por investigadores reconocidos de la Universidad de Newcastle, UK. [1] Después de una visita en los alrededores del a mina en 2008, el profesor Paul Younger encontró evidencia “de que lamentablemente la mina ha generado impactos incontrolados que tienen la potencialidad de seguir haciendo daño al medioambiente por siglos – y por lo tanto a la producción agrícola y a la salud de los pobladores – a menos que el plan de cierre se ajuste para asegurar que la empresa tiene tome las medidas necesarias con una garantía económica adecuada para mantenerlas para la perpetuidad.” Desde que la mina entró en operación, los pobladores de la zona han reportado la muerte de ganado, ríós secos, abortos, además de enfermedades respiratorias, de la piel, y del sistema gastro-intestinal. [2]

Según el Comité de Familiares de Detenidos y Desaparecidos en Honduras (COFADEH), actualmente los procesos legales en contra miembros del Comité Ambiental del Valle de Siria se relacionan con sus esfuerzos para proteger una mini-cuenca en la municipalidad de El Porvenir por la actividad maderera como parte de un plan de manejo forestal que el estado hondureño ha otorgado a Hayde Urrutia Mejía. COFADEH indica que esta cuenca abastece el agua para el consumo humano a seis comunidades de ese municipio, afectando en forma directa a 10,000 personas que han estado protegiendo este bosque por años. Dice además que los pobladores lograron la protección del area en 2007 cuando se formalizó el convenio firmado el 27 de diciembre de 2007, entre la entonces AFE/ COHDEFOR, la municipalidad del Porvenir y los habitantes. El Comité Ambiental del Valle de Siria considera que el plan de manejo forestal de Urrutia Mejía es ilegal por irregularidades en la tenencia de tierra y presuntamente por no haber llevado a cabo un Estudio de Impacto Ambiental a cabalidad con la participación local adecuada.

La organización Derechos en Acción informa que el Comité también está preocupado porque esta área se encuentra dentro de las concesiones otorgadas a GoldCorp en el pasado, y que debido a la degradación ambiental que podría provocar la actividad maderera, esto daría paso a la venta del terreno a la empresa minera y luego facilitar las licencias requeridas para proceder con la explotación de minerales. Un miembro del Centro Hondureño de Promoción para el Desarrollo Comunitario (CEHPRODEC) comparte la misma inquietud, diciendo que este caso representa "una nueva alianza estratégica entre los empresarios madereros y mineros."

Este conflicto estalló el 7 de abril de 2010, cuando alrededor de 600 moradores locales se opusieron a los avances de la actividad maderera en la zona. Se supone que fue este ultimo evento que resultó en los procesos legales que ahora enfrentan los miembros del comité.

Organizaciones hondureñas involucradas en este proceso han expresado su preocupación porque el sistema judicial está prestándose para la criminalización de los defensores y las defensoras de los derechos humanos, además de los intereses del capital nacional y extranjero.

Nuestras organizaciones internacionales de la sociedad civil, signatorias de esta carta, comparten preocupación por la criminalización de estos defensores y estas defensores del medioambiente. Los procesos legales en contra de los miembros del comité se agravan aún más por las condiciones fuertes que se han impuesto a través de las medidas sustitutivas a la prisión por el juzgado, las cuales les impiden monitorear y defender la cuenca. Por lo tanto, solicitamos que:

  1. El estado de Honduras tome las medidas necesarias y mecanismos efectivos para garantizar la libertad personal, el debido proceso y el ejercicio de defensa de los derechos humanos de Carlos Danilo Amador, Marlon Hernández, Juan Ángel Reconco y los demás miembros del Comité Ambientalista del Valle de Siria que han sido procesados;
  2. Que se suspenda todo acto de represalias en su contra; y
  3. Que se garantice en forma general el derecho a defender los derechos humanos universalmente reconocidos, como los que establece la Declaración Universal de los Defensores de las Naciones Unidas aprobada en 1998, además de las resoluciones de la OEA de 1999 y 2000.

Algunas organizaciones internacionales seguirán monitoreando este caso con el interes de que se adhiera al debido proceso y que se aplique la ley en una manera efectiva, mientras se garantiza la protección de los defensores y las defensoras de los derechos humanos y su derecho a seguir defendiéndolos.

Sinceramente,

Alliance for Global Justice (USA)
Atlantic Regional Solidarity Network (Canada)
BC CASA/Café Justicia (Canada)
Cambridge - El Salvador Sister City Project (MA, USA)
Campaign for Labor Rights (USA)
Canadians against Mining in El Salvador (CAMES)
Canada Philippines Solidarity for Human Rights
Canada Tibet Committee (CTC)
CEIBA (Guatemala)
Center for Alternative Mining Development Policy (Wisconsin, USA)
Center for International Environmental Law (Washington D.C., USA)
Chicago-Cinquera Sister Cities of Chicago (USA)
Chicago Religious Leadership Network on Latin America (CRLN) (Chicago, IL, USA)
CoDevelopment Canada
Comite de Apoyo para el Desarrollo Social en El Salvador (CODESES) (BC, Canada)
Colectivo Voces Ecológicas COVEC (Panamá)
Comité pour les droits humains en Amérique latine (CDHAL) (QC, Canada)
Comite Solidario Graciela Garcia (Los Angeles, CA, USA)
Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvador (CISPES) (USA)
Consejo Indigena MONEXICO (Nicaragua)
Council of Canadians
The Democracy Center (Bolivia and USA)
FNRP Collective – Vancouver (BC, Canada)
Friends of Chilama of Crystal Lake (IL, USA)
Hondurans for Democracy
Jamie Moffett Media Design & Production, Staff (USA)
Just Foreign Policy (USA)
Latin America Solidarity Committee - Milwaukee (USA)
La Voz de los de Abajo, Chicago (USA)
Lawrence-El Papaturro Friendship Committee of Lawrence, Kansas (USA)
Madison Arcatao Sister City Project (MASCP) (USA)
Maquila Solidarity Network (Canada)
Marin Interfaith Task Force on the Americas (CA, USA)
Maritimes-Guatemala Breaking the Silence Solidarity Network (Canada)
Maryknoll Office for Global Concerns (USA)
Midwest Coalition Against Lethal Mining (MCALM) (USA)
Mining Justice Alliance – Vancouver (BC, Canada)
Mining Justice – Ottawa (ON, Canada)
MiningWatch Canada
Nicaragua Network (USA)
Oberlin in Solidarity with El Salvador (OSES) (OH, USA)
The Polaris Institute (Canada)
Portland Central America Solidarity Committee (PCASC) (USA)
Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC)
Red Mexicana de Afectados por la Minería (REMA) (México)
Rights Action (USA & Canada)
The Social Justice Committee of Montreal (Canada)
UNBC Guatemala Research Group (Canada)
U.S.-El Salvador Sister Cities

[1] Younger, Paul, “Report on a visit to San Martín mine of Minerales Entremares S.A., Hondures on Sunday 16th November 2008,” 16 de diciembre de 2008; y Dr. Jarvis, Adam y Dr. Jaime Amezaga, “Technical review of mine closure plan and mine closure implementation at Minerales Entre Mares San Martin mine,Honduras,” junio de 2009.

[2] The Guardian, “Gold giant faces Honduras inquiry into alleged heavy metal pollution,” 31 de diciembre de 2009, http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2009/dec/31/goldcorp-honduras-poll... y Tribunal Latinoamericano de Agua, Audiencia pública en Guadalajara, Mexico, Caso Honduras, 11 de octubre de 2007, http://www.tragua.com/audiencias/2007/caso_honduras_mexico_2007.html

 

CTC National Office 1425 René-Lévesque Blvd West, 3rd Floor, Montréal, Québec, Canada, H3G 1T7
T: (514) 487-0665   ctcoffice@tibet.ca
Developed by plank